Research and Teaching

Teaching

Assistant Instructor – How People Learn: Implications for Educational Leadership (Summer 2017)

Content Developer/Project Manager – Science of Learning MOOC (Fall 2016)

Teaching Assistant – Educational Psychology (Spring 2015)

Research

My academic research centers on learning and motivational strategies that can improve STEM learning and comprehension, especially in technological environments. Please find below a compilation of academic research I’ve conducted, and relevant publications.

Productive Failure Responses for Future Learning

Role: Principal Investigator
Research Methods/Analysis: Pre/post-assessments, survey data, log data (data mining), eye-tracking
Cognitive Constructs: metacognition, problem-solving, strategy selection
Instructional Medium: Educational Game
Subject: High School Physics
Population: 10-12th grade, Graduate Level
Research Abstract: Failure is often discussed as a critical part of the pathway to success, but little is actually known about what must happen in the moment of failure to make it productive. Furthermore, failure might afford opportunities to glean information about one’s own performance, about the task at hand, and about the underlying system that governs the problem, but to take advantage of these opportunities requires additional effort and skill. Games provide a safe space for failure that permits for a variety of actions and strategies to be taken in response to failure, that may then lead to later success. What kinds of responses to failure in exploratory problem-solving environments are most effective for later learning? This set of studies sought to investigate the relationship between one metacognitive failure response “error-specification, info-seeking, and fixing” and learning from instruction that follows.
Associated Publications: Lee, A. (2017) Productive Failure Responses for Future Learning (Dissertation). Columbia University, New York, NY.
Lee, A., Liu, C., Jullamon, M., and Black, J.B. (2016, August). How’d That Happen? Failure in Game Spaces to Prepare Students for Future Learning. Published in the proceedings of the 12th Games+Learning+Society Conference, Madison, WI.

Persistence Through Play

Role: Investigator
Research Methods/Analysis: Pre/post-assessments, survey data, log data (data mining)
Cognitive Constructs: motivation (self-efficacy, engagement), persistence, computational thinking
Instructional Medium: Educational Game
Subject: Computer Programming
Population: 4th grade
Research Abstract: There is an increasing call for quality computer programming and computational skill instruction in the classroom for young learners, yet there is little known about how such skills can be developed within the constraints of the late-elementary school students’ capacity. Furthermore, programming is fundamentally iterative, prone to error, and requires flexible and persistent problem solving – a set of conditions that late-elementary students likely have not encountered. These series of studies investigated how persistence and computational thinking skill development can be facilitated through game environments.
Associated Publications:
Lee, A., Malkiewich, L., and Slater, S. (2016, August). Understanding the Gap: Gender Similarities and Differences in Persistence and Self-Efficacy in a Coding Game. Published in the proceedings of the 12th Games+Learning+Society Conference, Madison, WI.
Malkiewich, L., Lee, A., Slater, S. and Chase, C. (2016, August). Tenacious Assessments: Using In-Game Behaviors to Measure Student Persistence and Challenge Navigation. Published in the proceedings of the 12th Games+Learning+Society Conference, Madison, WI.
Malkiewich, L., Lee, A., Chase, C., Xing, C., Slater, S. (2016, June). No Lives Left: How Common Game Features Could Undermine Persistence, Challenge-Seeking and Learning To Program. Presented at the International Conference of Learning Sciences 2016, Singapore.
Malkiewich, L., Xing, C., Slater, S., Lee, A., Chase, C. (2016, April). Game Over: Detrimental Effects of Game Features on Persistence and Learning of Computer Programming.  Presented at the AERA Annual Meeting 2016, Washington, DC.

SciMod3: Multiple Modal Interactions for Science Learning

Role: Principal Investigator
Research Methods/Analysis: Eye-tracking, post-assessments
Cognitive Constructs: multimodal learning, comprehension, conceptual congruency
Instructional Medium: Simulation
Subject: Earth Science
Population: 3-5th grade; graduate level
Research Abstract: With the proliferation of tangible technologies (such as iPads, virtual and augmented reality technology) being used in the classroom, how do multiple modalities of information processing impact comprehension and attentional allocation? What happens when students don’t know how to meaningfully integrate visual, verbal, and tactile information, and how can we teach such skills to improve learning?
Associated Publications:
Lee, A., Friedman, B.P., Compres, L., and Black, J.B. (2015, May). Conceptual Congruency Impacts Comprehension and Attention Allocation in Educational Simulation Use. Presented at the APS Annual Meeting 2015, New York, NY.
Lee, A., Friedman, B.P., Compres, L., and Black, J.B. (2015, April). User Control: An Eye-Tracking Study on Late Elementary Science Learning in Interactive Environments. Presented at the AERA Annual Meeting 2015, Chicago, Il.
Friedman, B.P., Lee, A., Compres, L., and Black, J.B. (2015, April). Manipulating Multimedia: How Gestural Control Impacts Attention and Learning. Presented at the AERA Annual Meeting 2015, Chicago, Il.

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